Earthing’s great, even if it’s so obvious

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Ever shake your head at a “new” trend, because (a) it’s so obvious, and (b) it’s as old as dirt?

Case in point: “Earthing” — the notion that we benefit from connecting with the earth. Walking barefoot in grass. Napping in a field. Bare legs on the beach, feet sinking into wet sand.

Apparently that’s good for us. Who knew.

Seriously, aside from an excuse to sell “conductive” products which claim to facilitate entry of earth’s energy into the body, there’s something to this. Modern society has become so tech-focused, so screen-obsessed, so distractedly wired in one way or another, it’s literally bringing us down. Depression, anxiety, stress — all up in correlation with our increasingly gadget-oriented lives.

So while echoes of grandmas shooing kids outside to chase away the blues reach back eons, earthing is still a good trend, however trussed up as the latest and greatest.

Another term for earthing is “grounding” — as in literally. Making physical contact with natural ground, as well as electrical grounding. The idea is that Earth has an electrical vibe — an energy — which the body (also full of electricity) can easily absorb when in direct contact. Our bodies are mostly water, which is a great conductor of electricity. Grounding is said to balance electrical imbalances in the body.

Some recent studies suggest that simply connecting skin-to-earth (grass, dirt, anything natural directly connected to Earth) for as little as 15 minutes positively impacts mood, reduces pain, boosts immune systems, eliminates jet lag and more.

Does it work? Empirical evidence, and grandma’s wisdom, would suggest so. Who doesn’t feel good walking barefoot in the grass? Or digging toes in cool, wet sand? It can’t hurt. And we sure don’t need fancy products to get back to basics.

Well, after the snow thaws anyway.

•••

Sholeh Patrick is a columnist for the Hagadone News Network. Contact her at Sholeh@cdapress.com. She’ll answer when she gets back from earthing in Hawaii.

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