The Latest: South Korea, Japan welcome UN sanctions on North

AP

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  • China's United Nations Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks after voting to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 1

    South Korea's United Nations Ambassador Cho Tae-yul speaks after a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

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    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks to Uruguay's U.N. Ambassador Elbio Rosselli before a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 3

    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks to China's U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi after a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 4

    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks after voting to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • China's United Nations Ambassador Liu Jieyi speaks after voting to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 1

    South Korea's United Nations Ambassador Cho Tae-yul speaks after a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 2

    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks to Uruguay's U.N. Ambassador Elbio Rosselli before a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 3

    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks to China's U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi after a vote to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • 4

    United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks after voting to adopt a new sanctions resolution against North Korea during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

UNITED NATIONS (AP) The latest on the U.N. Security Council's attempt to rein in North Korea's nuclear weapons and missile programs (all times local):

11:30 p.m.

South Korea and Japan have welcomed the U.N. Security Council's new sanctions on North Korea in response to the country's latest nuclear test.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (SHIN'-zoh AH'-bay) said Tuesday in Tokyo that he highly appreciates what he called "a remarkably tough sanctions resolution." He added that "it is important to put an unprecedented level of pressure on North Korea to make it change its policies."

The sanctions were watered down from what the U.S. had sought, after negotiations with China.

Park Soo-hyun (Bahk Soo-hyohn), a spokesman for the South Korean president, said he thinks it's significant that China and Russia agreed on the need for stronger sanctions than previous ones. He said South Korea respects the consensus reached by the international community.

___

5:15 p.m.

The U.N. Security Council has unanimously approved new sanctions on North Korea in a watered-down resolution without an oil import ban or international asset freeze on the government and leader Kim Jong Un that the Trump administration wanted.

The resolution does ban North Korea from importing all natural gas liquids and condensates. But it only caps Pyongyang's imports of crude oil at the level of the last 12 months, and it limits the import of refined petroleum products to 2 million barrels a year.

It also bans all textile exports and prohibits all countries from authorizing new work permits for North Korean workers two key sources of hard currency.

   

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