APNewsBreak: Miss America hopefuls to face more questioning

AP

Print Article

  • In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss District of Columbia Briana Kinsey, left, embraces Miss Kentucky Molly Matney during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 1

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss New Hampshire Lauren Percy greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 2

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss Tennessee Caty Davis greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 3

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo Miss Utah JessiKate Riley walks during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 4

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss North Carolina Victoria Huggins greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists.(AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 5

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss America contestants sit during a welcome ceremony in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss District of Columbia Briana Kinsey, left, embraces Miss Kentucky Molly Matney during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 1

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss New Hampshire Lauren Percy greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 2

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss Tennessee Caty Davis greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 3

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo Miss Utah JessiKate Riley walks during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 4

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss North Carolina Victoria Huggins greets the crowd during a welcome ceremony for Miss America contestants in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists.(AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • 5

    In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, Miss America contestants sit during a welcome ceremony in Atlantic City, N.J. On Sept. 5, 2017, Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press the competition is adding a second round of onstage interview questioning for finalists. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The contestants in the final stages at the Miss America competition will have to answer a second round of questioning on the way to winning the crown.

Sam Haskell, executive chairman and CEO of the Miss America Organization, told The Associated Press that the second round of onstage interviews is designed to bring out more about the contestants.

"It's an opportunity to know who they are," he said. "So we decided to add a second question. They can't prepare for it; it's not about their platform."

Starting with this year's nationally televised finale on Sunday, seven contestants from the top 10 will be asked a personality question. From those seven, five will advance and be asked a second question on current events, societal issues or the like.

The addition of a second round of questioning comes as the onstage interview has played a significant role in helping to select the last two Miss Americas.

In 2015, Miss Georgia, Betty Cantrell, was asked whether she believed New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady cheated en route to his team's run to a Super Bowl title in the previous season by using footballs that were improperly deflated. Brady served a four-game suspension.

During the pageant, Cantrell said, "I'm not sure" when asked if Brady cheated. "I'd have to see the ball and feel it" she said, before adding, "If there's any question, then yes, he cheated."

In 2016, Miss Arkansas, Savvy Shields, was asked a question about Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. She answered that while both Clinton and Republican Donald Trump had done a good job thus far, "they also need to watch what they're doing."

Meeting reporters after the pageant, Shields elaborated.

"What I want both candidates to focus on is compromise," she said. "Our country was founded on compromise. We're in a state now where both parties just seem to be yelling at one another."

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC

    

Print Article

Read More Entertainment

TYLER WILSON:‘Mother!’ will shock, enthrall and infuriate

September 22, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Many viewers will hate “mother!” the chamber thriller/psychological horror film from “Black Swan” director Darren Aronofsky. For more than half its length, “mother!” masks itself as a moody haunted h...

Comments

Read More

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

AP

September 22, 2017 at 11:59 am | A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked...

Comments

Read More

Hannity boycott call fizzling, at least publicly

AP

September 22, 2017 at 11:06 am | NEW YORK (AP) — More than a month after a liberal advocacy group publicly called on advertisers to boycott Sean Hannity's show on Fox News Channel, luxury carmaker Cadillac has been the only new comp...

Comments

Read More

All opposed? Jordan Klepper's 'Opposition' spoof sure is

AP

September 22, 2017 at 8:54 am | NEW YORK (AP) — Jordan Klepper's new Comedy Central series, "The Opposition," aims to rally a rash of outrageous world views. Klepper is a former correspondent for Comedy Central's fake newscast,...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2017 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X