‘Global leader’ coming to town

Print Article

Why pass another Thursday night with the same ennui? Instead, your Sept. 7 dinner could be regaled by tales of presidents past from award-winning storyteller Jon Meacham.

If American history sounds boring, trust me; this won’t be. A fiction fan myself, I am nevertheless riveted to the Idaho Humanities Council’s Distinguished Humanities Lecture at the nonprofit’s annual dinner affair. Its nationally acclaimed author-speakers are not only intelligent, accomplished, and highly knowledgeable — they deliver with humor and an entertaining style. I always learn something. I’m always made to think anew, to perceive some part of history differently than before.

That’s just what the humanities are about — they shape us, by broadening the context of the human experience. Philosophy, religion, and history. Music and art; language and literature. How dull life would we be without them; how little we would understand ourselves beyond the borders of an individual life.

Jon Meacham is executive editor and vice president of Random House Publishing Group, and one of America’s most prominent public intellectuals. A skilled storyteller, biographer, and former Newsweek and Time magazine editor, he’s a regular on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, and has appeared on Meet the Press, the Colbert Report, PBS’s Charlie Rose, and several documentaries. His biography of George H.W. Bush held the top spot on the New York Times bestseller list.

Described by critics as masterful, balanced, and intimate, Meacham’s writings explore the lives of other presidents, examine the historical impacts of FDR and Churchill’s close friendship, and earned him spots on national and international advisory groups. The World Economic Forum named him a “Global Leader for Tomorrow.”

The list goes on (did I mention a Pulitzer?), but the gist is that Meacham is more than mere writer with the gift of gab. He has well-respected insight on how history impacts daily life, and what wisdom we may take from it.

Like Meacham, IHC speakers are generally prize-winning journalists and authors. Fiction or nonfiction, invariably they are great storytellers. The human experience is, after all, a story.

For more information about IHC and the Sept. 7 event, see Idahohumanities.org or call (888) 345-5346.

•••

Sholeh Patrick, J.D. is a columnist for the Hagadone News Network. Contact her at Sholeh@cdapress.com.

Print Article

Read More Sholeh Patrick

Public defenders preserve liberty

November 16, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press This is one of those “don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone” things. One of the many and — literally — vital blessings we Americans have is a public defender. Do we stop at taking this fundamenta...

Comments

Read More

Scientists issue their own global warning

November 14, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press They call it America’s Pledge. A growing group of states, cities, businesses and organizations both public and private, worried and angry at the president’s refusal to allow the U.S. to join internat...

Comments

Read More

Here’s why Charlie Brown didn’t get elected

November 09, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press With only 8 percent turnout, Tuesday’s local elections didn’t exactly go out with a bang. That’s too bad; city government has much more impact on voters’ daily lives than such a paltry showing sugges...

Comments

Read More

Here’s why you need to vote today

November 07, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Today is election day. While local elections draw far fewer voters than national races, it makes little sense. Local officials have more immediate, and it could be argued, greater impact on daily lif...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2017 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X