Free screening of film about Montana conservation icon

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Courtesy photo Bud Moore

COEUR d’ALENE — District Ranger, soldier, fur trapper, wilderness advocate — Bud Moore was all of these. During a long career with the Forest Service, he was part of many key events in the history of conservation and public land management during the 20th century.

“Bud’s Place,” a 60-minute film about Moore by George Sibley, will be screened at the library Friday, Aug. 25, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room. The screening is free.

Later at his sustainable forestry operation — “Coyote Forest” in Montana’s Swan Valley — Moore walked his talk about the values and virtues of living in harmony with the natural world.

The life of Moore, who died in 2010 at 93, is told using interviews, historic films and photographs, many taken by Moore.

Sibley, a documentary and educational filmmaker for more than 40 years, said he likes to choose projects that connect science and history. He has often filmed here in the West. “Shadows of David Thompson,” about the fur trader and early map maker, was shown on Idaho and Montana PBS stations. “Ordeal By Fire” followed in this vein, combining a mini-history of wildfires in North America with an illustration of the big 1910 burn on the Idaho-Montana border, the biggest forest fire in North American history.

Sibley has completed projects for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service, and in June, his film about the astronomer William Herschel was shown at Cambridge and Oxford Universities in the U.K.

“Bud’s Place” was produced with support from the Idaho Humanities Council — the state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities — the Montana Wilderness Association, the Society of American Foresters and the Vital Ground Foundation. The local screening is sponsored by the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.

Mostly making educational films and documentaries. In 2005, three of his Florida conservation documentaries were shown nationally on the DISH network’s satellite channel program “Free Speech TV.” His film “Lewis and Clark and US” was broadcast on Montana Public Television as part of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial.

Back in Florida, “Smyrnea Lost and Found” told the story of the origins of what became the town of New Smyrna Beach and won the “Outstanding Preservation Media of 2007” award from the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation.

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