He did it — and so can you

Print Article

If Vegas had been taking bets on Julian Redmanís bid to ride an overgrown tricycle (minus one small wheel) from sea to shining sea, Press staffers Lisa James and Devin Heilman would be wealthy young ladies today.

And their managing editor would be broke.

Instead, Devin, Lisa and mankind in general all came out on top when Redman, a Coeur díAlene man who dreams big and lives even bigger, completed his trans-America trek earlier this week on whatís known as a penny-farthing bicycle.

Whatís incredible is that in half the time projected ó it took him just one and a half months ó the 28-year-old pedaled from San Francisco to Boston. That he did so on the unorthodox bike, without any real training, without any real support team along that 3,333-mile trail, leads to our guess that Vegas wouldíve put Julianís odds at something like 10,000 to 1. Equipment problems? Heat stroke? Injured by an unaware motorist? Food poisoning? The possible pitfalls are too numerous to name. Yet Julian Redman conquered every challenge.

As a result, Devin and Lisa collect one (1) coffee of their choice for backing the boy on the bike.

Everyone else banks some serious inspiration. Or do they?

Because itís so easy, many of us are riveted to the wrong outcomes. We see the barriers just beyond our noses and back down. We refuse to tackle the toughest challenges, settling for participation medals. Why bother reaching when what you want might just end up landing at your feet anyway? And if it doesnít, who really cares?

Well, Mr. Redmanís reminder is that many of us rank-and-filers have a lot more in our tanks ó and our imaginations ó than we might think. Pushing ourselves well outside comfort zones is the only way to begin to realize our actual potential and accomplish truly stellar goals. Riding in the shadow of history on an old-fashioned bike is just one way to do that. But we think itís a pretty cool one.

As the late, great Christopher Reeve said: ďSo many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.Ē

Hereís to making all good things inevitable.

Print Article

Read More Editorial

Disagree, but please donít attack

September 22, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Our community is enjoying and hopefully benefitting from some vigorous debate over Kootenai Countyís form of government: Three elected commissioners holding the pursestrings and setting policy, and s...

Comments

Read More

Put a match to frivolous timber lawsuits

September 20, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Some people still donít understand that trees are a renewable resource. They donít know ó†or refuse to believe clear scientific evidence ó†that†strategic timber harvests are actually good for long-t...

Comments

Read More

Light at end of the U.S. debt tunnel

September 18, 2017 at 11:48 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Twenty is the magic number. Can you see the connection? Congressional approval ratings are hovering around 20 percent. And theyíre headed toward the basement rather than the ceiling. The national ...

Comments

Read More

The secret behind our bad summers

September 15, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Blame God, greenhouse gases or just bad luck. Summer sucks. Sorry, but the joy of North Idaho summers seems to have gone up in smoke the past few years, with 2017 hitting the bottom of the once-joy...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2017 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X