Starbucks barista has meltdown over Unicorn Frappuccino

AP

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  • A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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    A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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    A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • 1

    A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • 2

    A Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino drink sits on display, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Philadelphia. Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video on Twitter complaining that the drink was difficult to make and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

SEATTLE (AP) A Starbucks barista has taken to social media hoping to make orders for the coffee chain's much buzzed about Unicorn Frappuccino disappear.

Starbucks' entry into the unicorn food craze was released Wednesday and its popularity was too much for 19-year-old Colorado barista Braden Burson. He posted a video (now-deleted) on Twitter after his shift complaining that it was difficult to keep up with orders for the drink and he's "never been so stressed out" in his life.

The Unicorn Frappuccino is a sweet and sour pink and blue cream swirl topped with what Starbucks calls "fairy powder." Burson says in the video that a day of making the treat left him with sticky hands and residue from the drink stuck to his clothes and in his hair.

Burson tells The Associated Press that he didn't think his rant would get this much publicity and he didn't intend to "downgrade" the drink.

"It's a great drink. But it is difficult to make when there are like 20 fraps all at once both front and drive thru," he wrote in a Facebook message.

Starbucks said in a statement Thursday that the popular reception of the drink has "exceeded everyone's expectations." It added that it is reaching out to Burson "to talk about his experience and how to make it better."

Burson said he hadn't heard from the company as of midday Thursday.

 

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