GALLERY: Eagle Aviary

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  • LOREN BENOIT/Press Coeur d'Alene Tribe families, friends and U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologists gather Wednesday afternoon as Andy Zachary, Rachael Allan and kammille Sims perform ceremonial music prior to the Tribe receiving four new eagles for the Tribe's eagle aviary, which is on the Birds of Prey Northwest property outside of St Maries.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press From left, Andy Zachary, Rachael Allan and Kammille Sims of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe perform ceremonial music prior to the Tribe receiving four new eagles on Wednesday at Birds of Prey Northwest outside of St Maries.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eagle expert Jane Veltkamp, the owner and operator of Birds of Prey Northwest, holds a female bald eagle before placing it into the House of the Bald Eagle aviary, owned by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The Tribe was presented with proper permits in October by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to receive the four injured eagles to help steward the birds who can't survive in the wild on their own.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press Jane Veltkamp, owner and operator of Birds of Prey Northwest, carries a golden eagle to its aviary Wednesday afternoon. Veltkamp will train Coeur d'Alene Tribe members how to feed and care for the birds.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press Coeur d'Alene Tribe members and families watch as bald and golden eagles enter their new aviaries at Birds of Prey Northwest Wednesday afternoon.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press A golden eagle is seen inside its aviary at Birds of Prey Northwest Wednesday afternoon. The golden eagle came from southern Idaho and has an injured leg and is the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's first golden eagle.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eventually the Coeur d'Alene Tribe hopes to move the aviary to a more central location for cultural and educational purposes.

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    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eagle expert and federally recognized U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Jane Veltkamp, center, passes a golden eagle feather that fell off an injured golden eagle to Coeur d'Alene Tribe Elder Alfred Nomee for the Tribe's keeping. The only people to legally have eagle feathers are federally recognized tribes, which display feathers on their regalia during religious and cultural ceremonies.

  • LOREN BENOIT/Press Coeur d'Alene Tribe families, friends and U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologists gather Wednesday afternoon as Andy Zachary, Rachael Allan and kammille Sims perform ceremonial music prior to the Tribe receiving four new eagles for the Tribe's eagle aviary, which is on the Birds of Prey Northwest property outside of St Maries.

  • 1

    LOREN BENOIT/Press From left, Andy Zachary, Rachael Allan and Kammille Sims of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe perform ceremonial music prior to the Tribe receiving four new eagles on Wednesday at Birds of Prey Northwest outside of St Maries.

  • 2

    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eagle expert Jane Veltkamp, the owner and operator of Birds of Prey Northwest, holds a female bald eagle before placing it into the House of the Bald Eagle aviary, owned by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The Tribe was presented with proper permits in October by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to receive the four injured eagles to help steward the birds who can't survive in the wild on their own.

  • 3

    LOREN BENOIT/Press Jane Veltkamp, owner and operator of Birds of Prey Northwest, carries a golden eagle to its aviary Wednesday afternoon. Veltkamp will train Coeur d'Alene Tribe members how to feed and care for the birds.

  • 4

    LOREN BENOIT/Press Coeur d'Alene Tribe members and families watch as bald and golden eagles enter their new aviaries at Birds of Prey Northwest Wednesday afternoon.

  • 5

    LOREN BENOIT/Press A golden eagle is seen inside its aviary at Birds of Prey Northwest Wednesday afternoon. The golden eagle came from southern Idaho and has an injured leg and is the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's first golden eagle.

  • 6

    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eventually the Coeur d'Alene Tribe hopes to move the aviary to a more central location for cultural and educational purposes.

  • 7

    LOREN BENOIT/Press Eagle expert and federally recognized U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Jane Veltkamp, center, passes a golden eagle feather that fell off an injured golden eagle to Coeur d'Alene Tribe Elder Alfred Nomee for the Tribe's keeping. The only people to legally have eagle feathers are federally recognized tribes, which display feathers on their regalia during religious and cultural ceremonies.

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